Schkinny Maninny - feeling, looking and being FAB!

June 22, 2016

Posted in


Breaking the habit

Before my pregnancy I was pretty pristine in my eating (Monday to Friday, that is, the weekends are much less strict), I ate like a mostly raw vegan and felt wonderful for it.  But along comes a baby, and I started craving things like dairy and was just hungry all the time, so I found myself loosening up the standards and allowing myself to eat what my body needed during the pregnancy (not burgers and chips every night), but I did eat more meat, dairy, pasta, rice, etc.  Now I am still breastfeeding, so I haven’t quite gone back to my very clean eating days, but I have been thinking how I am going to “quit” some of the foods I have become quite attached to.  Mostly cheese…  I find myself having cheese every day, and yes, I might need dairy to help give me baby a good balance of vitamins and minerals.  When I finish breastfeeding, do I still really need to be having cheese every day?  Definitely not.  So how to break the habit, what is the best way?

Cold turkey

Often a method used to just stop something.  I could just stop buying yhr cheese, then I won’t have in the fridge, then I simply wont be able to eat it everyday.  But the problem is, what if on the weekend I feel like having a little grated cheese on my dinner?  Then I won’t have any cheese in the house at all, and could very well just run to the corner store and get some.  Then the cheese is back in the fridge again.

Constant reminders

Sometimes we fall into bad habits when our will power fades.  I might promise myself that tomorrow I won’t have any cheese, but then when lunch time rolls around, I am super hungry and I am making my salad and I think, “Oh just a little bit of cheese will make this salad so much tastier and fill me up too”.  The reminder that flashes on my phone will be completely ignored!

Thinking differently

Most habits give us some sort of satisfaction or psychological reward, which is why we keep doing them.  I do love the taste of cheese!  But I also love the taste of chocolate and I don’t need to eat that every day.  I think I have also associated eating cheese with reminding myself I am getting a serve of dairy to help me give my baby more nutritionally balanced milk.  So when I finish breastfeeding, I will start thinking about cheese in a different way.  I will be re-framing the way I think about eating, less of “its good for the baby” more like “cheese is loaded with saturated fat, salt and cholesterol and I am doing this to my body every day”.  I think I will cut back tomorrow!

Can you really lose weight just by exercise alone?

I have recently just read a fascinating compilation of studies that suggest that exercise alone will not result in weight loss.  This is quite contrary to our popular belief, and that espoused by innumerable fitness trainers, that suggests if we eat a meal of double cheese-burgers with chips totalling 500 calories then all we have to do is jump on the stepper, set our goal to burn 500 calories and all will be struck from the record.  But it seems as though it isn’t quite that simple.

While 100% of the energy we gain comes from food,  we can only burn about 10-30% of it in physical activity (excluding professional athletes).  There are three main components to energy expenditure, 1) Basal metabolic rate, which is energy to make your body perform basic functions, 2) energy used to break down food, 3) energy used in physical activity.  Your body uses about 60-80% of energy to perform your basic functions and keep you alive, digesting and breaking down food used 10% and the rest is used for physical activity. 

This is all not suggesting that physical activity is not an incredibly important part of a healthy, long and happy life, because it most certainly is.  But conceiving that weight loss is as simple as calories out must be more than calories in, is not quite right.  Blaming obesity on poor physical activity isn’t strictly true as it seems that it is more so the over consumption of low quality food that is more to blame.

You can read the full article here: http://www.vox.com/2016/4/28/11518804/weight-loss-exercise-myth-burn-calories

March 31, 2016

Posted in healthy, healthy eating, healthy food, nuts, raw, roasted nuts


RAW vs Roasted

Roasted nuts are delicious right?  Buttery crunchy melt in your mouth goodness!  But we have all heard that roasted nuts are bad for you. 

Nuts can be oil roasted or dry roasted, it turns out the “oil roasting” process is actually frying!  So look on the ingredients list and if you see oil in the ingredients then you .  When they are “oil roasted” they do absorb about 5% of the oil they are cooked in, which does increase their calorie content. 

Overall, they measure up like this:

  • Oil roasted nuts are definitely higher in calories than raw nuts
  • They do have the same amount of protein
  • There is extra fat in the roasted nuts
  • The carbs and fibre content of the raw and roasted nuts are the same
  • For essential minerals – iron, magnesiym and phosphorous raw nuts are higher

During the roasting process, nuts do not lose their heart healthy mono unsaturated  fat, but the polyunsaturated fats may become altered and become more vulnerable to oxidation which increases their chance of becoming rancid.

 Overall, if you can opt for the raw ones over the roasted ones, and if you must eat the roasted ones, then try to find the dry roasted nuts rather than the oil roasted version.

March 16, 2016

Posted in believe, goals, healthy eating, weight loss


Do you believe?

Do you know how important it is to believe in yourself?  Not to sound like a Tony Robbins seminar, but it is true, when you believe in yourself you can do anything.  Well most things, at least something that you want to do…  I am 36 years, 5 foot nothing, so even if I believed so much that I could make it as a basketball professional, that is most likely never going to happen.

BUT, if there is something that you do want to and it is achievable, like starting a business, changing your lifestyle, losing weight, or picking up a new hobby, then belief is the most important thing.  When you believe something is possible you have the absolute expectation that an outcome is inevitable. 

Do you believe the sun will rise tomorrow?  Maybe you won’t be able to see it because it is raining, but you still know it will rise.  When you plan your day, you don’t pack a torch because you know there will be daylight for you to see.  If someone told you that the sun won't rise tomorrow, you probably won't believe them because you just know that it will.

Imagine if you could take that unshakeable belief to other things that you want to do.  You believe you will fit into those jeans again, so you make decisions that reflect your belief.  You eat well, you go to the gym, you fill your grocery trolley up with fruits and vegetables because you believe.  It is the unconscious decisions you make once you have believe in something that will make your belief a reality.

If there is a goal you want to achieve, or even just a new state of mind you would like to adopt, start telling yourself you can!

March 09, 2016

Posted in healthy, healthy eating, healthy food


Why is the colour of your food important?

I love a colourful salad, lots of vibrancy with purples, oranges, reds and greens.  Not only does it look pretty, but the colour in your food is a good health indicator too.  Here is what the colours mean:

Purple – deep rich burgundy colours like in eggplant, beetroot, purple grapes and purple cabbage contain  anthocyanins and consequently may be responsible for reducing the risk of high blood pressure and lowering cholesterol.  These compounds mop up free radicals and soothe inflammation.  You can easily add grated beetroot to a salad to give it a bit of extra crunch and your healthy boost.

Orange – vibrant warm colours like in carrots, oranges, pumpkins contain flavonoids, lycopene, potassium, vitamin C and beta-carotene, which is vitamin A.  These nutrients aid in eye health, reduce the risk of prostate cancer, lower blood pressure and lower bad cholesterol.  Orange foods make a delicious and easy salad – roast some pumpkin, grate up carrots, quarter some oranges, sprinkle some sultanas and olive oil and you have a very easy fresh summery salad.

Red – glowing bright coloured foods like tomatoes, red capsicum, strawberries, cherries are full of the following nutrients; lycopene, ellagic acid, quercetin, hesperidin, fiber, Vitamin A and Vitamin C.  These winners help to protect the body from prostate, cervical and lung cancer, reduce tumour growth, and protect the body against heart disease. 

Green – leafy looking lovelies like spinach, broccoli, zucchini contain chorophyll which is responsible for the colouring, but they also contain fibre, luteinzeaxanthin, calcium, folate, vitamin C and beta-carotene.  These nutrients boost the immune system, help to cleanse the blood, and fight free radicals in your body to help reduce the risk of cancer. 

 

March 09, 2016

Posted in healthy, healthy eating, healthy food


Why is the colour of your food important?

I love a colourful salad, lots of vibrancy with purples, oranges, reds and greens.  Not only does it look pretty, but the colour in your food is a good health indicator too.  Here is what the colours mean:

Purple – deep rich burgundy colours like in eggplant, beetroot, purple grapes and purple cabbage contain  anthocyanins and consequently may be responsible for reducing the risk of high blood pressure and lowering cholesterol.  These compounds mop up free radicals and soothe inflammation.  You can easily add grated beetroot to a salad to give it a bit of extra crunch and your healthy boost.

Orange – vibrant warm colours like in carrots, oranges, pumpkins contain flavonoids, lycopene, potassium, vitamin C and beta-carotene, which is vitamin A.  These nutrients aid in eye health, reduce the risk of prostate cancer, lower blood pressure and lower bad cholesterol.  Orange foods make a delicious and easy salad – roast some pumpkin, grate up carrots, quarter some oranges, sprinkle some sultanas and olive oil and you have a very easy fresh summery salad.

Red – glowing bright coloured foods like tomatoes, red capsicum, strawberries, cherries are full of the following nutrients; lycopene, ellagic acid, quercetin, hesperidin, fiber, Vitamin A and Vitamin C.  These winners help to protect the body from prostate, cervical and lung cancer, reduce tumour growth, and protect the body against heart disease. 

Green – leafy looking lovelies like spinach, broccoli, zucchini contain chorophyll which is responsible for the colouring, but they also contain fibre, luteinzeaxanthin, calcium, folate, vitamin C and beta-carotene.  These nutrients boost the immune system, help to cleanse the blood, and fight free radicals in your body to help reduce the risk of cancer. 

 

February 09, 2016

Posted in


Waist Training

I have just discovered the new concept of waist training, literally about an hour ago I saw something in Facebook and clicked on it.  Like me, you might be thinking, hhm what exactly is that?  Basically it is a corset. 

Turns out, the curvy likes of the Kardashian clan are partial to this form of torture.  You don’t get those killer curves without the killer pain.  The waist trainers are supposed to work by reducing your appetite, you want to eat less if you have something strapped around your belly.  Makes sense.  But it looks like it might actually help to shift your internal organs and help you pass out more often.

After giving birth, I did have a terrible separation in my tummy muscles from carrying the baby.  It happens to some people, others are lucky not to experience it.  To help me bring the separated muscles back together, I did use a belly band to help remind me to suck in my tummy.  So I do get it and the belly band did help me, but it also hindered me too.  I lost strength in my lower back because I was relying on the band for my posture, rather than using my muscles.